Frenchies stolen in California recovered in Pennsylvania amid increase in thefts of the dog breed

French bulldog stolen in California recovered in Pennsylvania amid rise in thefts of the dog breed

Do you know a Frenchies that was stolen from its owner in California during a walk has been recovered nearly 3,000 miles away in Philadelphia.

Rachel Avery was walking her Frenchie, Jag, in West Hollywood earlier this month when he slipped out of his collar, Los Angeles ABC station KABC reported.

Surveillance video shows the dog running around the neighborhood before a man exited a black SUV and scooped him up before driving away.

Days later, Avery received a call from someone in Philadelphia who promised to hand over the dog if she did not press charges, saying they did not steal him, Avery said.

“When I heard he was in Philadelphia, it was unbelievable,” Avery said.

French Bulldog’s mom Avery traveled to Philadelphia over the weekend,

where she was reunited with Jag at the airport,It’s not clear how exactly the dog made it across the country.

“I was in shock that so quickly a dog can be taken and then transported to another state, but here he is, snoring behind me,”

she said, adding that she was so grateful to law enforcement, who took the theft very seriously, and her community, who rallied behind her when the dog was stolen.

Thefts of French bulldogs have been on the rise in Los Angeles and around the country due to their high value.

French bulldogs are an “expensive, in-demand breed,” costing as much as $5,000 per dog, which gives incentive to steal them, knowing that their resale value will likely be high as well, Kitty Block, CEO and president of the Humane Society of the United States, told ABC News in a statement.

The breed is small and likely won’t hurt their abductor, which “might explain why thieves gravitate toward snatching them,” Block said.

Los Angeles witness increase in French bulldog thefts

 Los Angeles sees rise in French bulldog thefts

Thefts of French bulldogs have been on the rise in Los Angeles and around the country due to their high value.

The breed is small and likely won’t hurt their abductor, which “might explain why thieves gravitate toward snatching them,

” Block said.”When someone’s pet is stolen, it is a heart wrenching experience filled with fear and immense grief,” she said,

Adding that several high-profile cases involving the breed in recent months is evidence that they are being targeted. ‘

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